• Self-Addressed Letters to a Young Poet: The ‘Unsupported’ Artist

    Self-Addressed Letters to a Young Poet: The ‘Unsupported’ Artist

    Lee Posna explores what exactly it means to be an ‘unsupported artist’ – earnest, but unrecognised – in light of the prevailing conditions of our time.

  • Internet Histories | 21 April

    Internet Histories | 21 April

    Inside Google X, the quiet devastation of ‘living apart’ and America’s food problem

  • Saul Steinberg, "Milano--My Room--Bar del Grillo", 1937

    Talking Past Our Obsessions: A Case for Reading Generously

    Some books and films you love too much – too much to take them apart, too much to engage with them critically. Bree Huntley’s own approach is simple – don’t talk about them, talk around them. Here, she shows how it’s done.

  • Cracked Actor: The Hating of Kristen Stewart and Hollywood Deformance

    Cracked Actor: The Hating of Kristen Stewart and Hollywood Deformance

    Eternally brooding, a high-minded reader, and roundly despised: is Kristen Stewart obliviously awful, or is she the first female actor in decades to completely wreck what ‘being a starlet’ is? Soong Phoon investigates.

  • Internet Histories | 7 April

    Internet Histories | 7 April

    This edition: David Fisher’s great retirement letter from Twitter, and why the rest of you should rein it in.

  • Everything Answered, Nothing Asked: Geoffrey Palmer’s Reform and the Nature of Memoir

    Everything Answered, Nothing Asked: Geoffrey Palmer’s Reform and the Nature of Memoir

    A 750-page memoir by the 33rd Prime Minister of NZ? Couldn’t it be 850 pages? But reading Geoffrey Palmer’s “Reform” begs some interesting questions about how – and for who – people compile a record of memories and encounters, as Di White discovers.

  • A Modest Deposit

    A Modest Deposit

    First home-buyers have a choice: rent and be damned, or save in slim hope. But the rentier class have needs too – and if the solution involves some form of ritual self-abasement and desecration, then that’s just the Kiwi way. Our essential how-to guide.

  • John Martin, "The Great Day Of His Wrath", c.1853

    Eschatology And The Perpetual Classical Music Apocalypse

    No one has learnt to expect the death of classical music (and therefore, culture itself) like classical music purists. Celeste Oram takes a look why critics, musicians and composers are so preoccupied by The End, and dares to suggest what that End would look like.

  • Something to Reach Beyond: An Interview with Alice Miller

    Something to Reach Beyond: An Interview with Alice Miller

    Lee Posna talks to Alice Miller about her debut collection The Limits, a book of elegiac poems that inhabit and explore myth, and pose vital questions about art.

  • A Portrait of the Researcher as a Patient Man

    A Portrait of the Researcher as a Patient Man

    J.C Beaglehole’s towering work on the travels of Captain Cook and the early European footsteps in Aotearoa made him a student staple for centuries – but as Will Pollard discovers, a new book of letters suggests he didn’t always find it that fun.

Recent

Review: Vice

Review: Vice

Vice sets out to challenge audience perceptions, but it seems more concerned with the way it’s perceived than saying or questioning anything.

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Review: Flip Grater, ‘Pigalle’

Review: Flip Grater, ‘Pigalle’

Clare Grater’s fourth album bears all the trappings of its smoky, languorous and frequently lovelorn European settings. But despite having all the right ingredients, it feels like something’s missing.

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Review: The Water Station

Review: The Water Station

Using the training of Japanese Nō and Chinese Xiqu practices, The Water Station is a beautiful and compelling master class in simplicity.

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Review: My Bed My Universe

Review: My Bed My Universe

Massive Company’s My Bed My Universe is a multimedia collaboration that feels like a missed opportunity.

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Review: Angels in America

Review: Angels in America

Marking the end of Shane Bosher’s time at Silo Theatre, Angels in America is an epic, sprawling, spectacular event.

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Review: Billy Bragg

Review: Billy Bragg

Billy Bragg is avowedly the second-most famous working-class anthem peddler to play in Auckland this month, for obvious reasons. But seeing him solo and with band at the Powerstation on 25th March made a compelling argument for why he’s the best.

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Internet Histories | 24 March

Internet Histories | 24 March

The state of writing on music writing, working as a cultured robot or not at all and YouTube unpleasantness

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Review: Daffodils

Review: Daffodils

Dark, beautiful and complex, Daffodils weaves a personal story into half a century of New Zealand music to create a stunningly cohesive portrait of our nation.

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Photo: Fiona Goodall/Getty Images AsiaPac

Review: Bruce Springsteen and The E Street Band

Doug Dillaman reviews Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band, 1 March 2013, Auckland.

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Review: Sea

Review: Sea

Red Leap Theatre’s newest show, Sea, is visually stunning but lacks narrative cohesion and emotional depth.

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