• New Zealand Poetry Mixtape 2014

    New Zealand Poetry Mixtape 2014

    For National Poetry Day, a mixtape of New Zealand poets curated by Hera Lindsay Bird and Ashleigh Young.

  • The Pantograph Punch Presents: Poetry Posters

    The Pantograph Punch Presents: Poetry Posters

    Two poetry posters for you to enjoy: Bats by Ashleigh Young and Ways of Making Love by Hera Lindsay Bird.

  • DRIVE: Arts Policy Debate

    DRIVE: Arts Policy Debate

    A recap of the arts policy debate that took place at Q Theatre on Tuesday 12th August

  • The Father Land: States of Becoming in the Writings of Martin Edmond

    The Father Land: States of Becoming in the Writings of Martin Edmond

    Simon Comber on the blurred line between fiction and non-fiction, and on discovering and journeying and becoming in the work of Martin Edmond.

  • Internet Histories | 11 August

    Internet Histories | 11 August

    The Kim Kardashian game

  • This Is Sheffield: Florian Habicht and ‘Pulp: A Movie About Life, Death And Supermarkets’

    This Is Sheffield: Florian Habicht and ‘Pulp: A Movie About Life, Death And Supermarkets’

    Florian Habicht’s documentary about Pulp and their home city, Sheffield, isn’t just the best music documentary this year – it points a way out of biography and historicising into a better way of understanding acts we love. Joe Nunweek chats to him about brutalist housing projects, doing his subjects justice, and Pulp’s last show.

  • On Creative Nonfiction

    On Creative Nonfiction

    Why is journalism represented as ‘the truth’ when reality is so much more complicated than an objective set of facts? Geum Hye Kim pulls together a tragedy in her native Korea, Psy, and US militarism to explore the interface between lying, creative nonfiction and radical subjectivity.

  • New York to Napier: Tom Gould on ‘Skin’

    New York to Napier: Tom Gould on ‘Skin’

    Dominic Hoey talks to expatriate photographer and filmmaker Tom Gould about capturing the moment in a town that’s always building over it, jet-setting with Action Bronson, and his powerful short documentary on an upstanding Mongrel Mob member.

  • A Brief History of Silo Theatre

    A Brief History of Silo Theatre

    Silo Theatre is renowned for it’s slick, sexy, contemporary shows, but this wasn’t always the case. We take a look back at the thirteen years Shane Bosher spent building the company from ground up.

  • Guy Montgomery on The Most Fun Thing He Can Do

    Guy Montgomery on The Most Fun Thing He Can Do

    We chat to this year’s Billy T Award winner, Guy Montgomery about stand-up, vulnerability, and why he does what he does.

Recent

Review: Voices of the Land: Nga Reo o te Whenua and Sol LeWitt

Review: Voices of the Land: Nga Reo o te Whenua and Sol LeWitt

Profiles of the American artist Sol LeWitt and the New Zealand ethnomusicologist Richard Nunns explore the passage of cultural knowledge – and all its disruptions, too.

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Review: Terror Highway

Review: Terror Highway

Terror Highway is a fun and electric exploitation film for the stage, told entirely in dance.

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Review: Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter

Review: Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter

Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter is a surreal and hilarious fairy tale driven by alienation and imagination.

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Review: Erewhon

Review: Erewhon

Erewhon is an ethereal and meditative little wonder, combining stunning cinematography and hypnotic narration to offer us a glimpse into our past, present and future.

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Review: Pulp: A Movie About Life, Death and Supermarkets

Review: Pulp: A Movie About Life, Death and Supermarkets

Ahead of further screenings here, in Australia, and in the States, Richard Bol reviews what makes the documentary on Jarvis Cocker’s beloved 90s group tick – and eventually click.

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Review: MAMIL

Review: MAMIL

MAMIL is a one-dimensional tale of non-redemption that trades in tired racial stereotypes for laughs.

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Washington DC in the Prime Minister’s Shadow

Washington DC in the Prime Minister’s Shadow

An excerpt from James Robinson’s new book, Voyages in America.

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Review: It Follows

Review: It Follows

Despite tracking the spectre of a supernatural STI, It Follows is a sweet, slow-moving entry to the horror-movie canon.

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Review: Toons for Tots

Review: Toons for Tots

We sent a 6-year-old to review this year’s film fest anthology of animated children’s shorts. So which were boring, which were good, which were sad, and which made him sleepy? Sarah Finnigan-Walsh reports back.

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Review: Boyhood

Review: Boyhood

Richard Linklater has always captured the passing of time in surprising, iridescent ways – but even by his standards, ‘Boyhood’ is startling – 12 years in the making, and worth every minute.

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