• Scarce Pleasures, Heavy Loads: Selling My Records

    Scarce Pleasures, Heavy Loads: Selling My Records

    In a year, Henry Oliver left a job, closed a bar, had his first child and did the one thing that would have once seemed more terrifying than any of those: sold off most of his records. He traces the outline of his own collecting habits, and what they meant.

  • The Pantograph Picks: NZIFF 2014

    The Pantograph Picks: NZIFF 2014

    Pulp, forgeries and an extraterrestrial ScarJo: Joe Nunweek, Rosabel Tan and guest writer Hugh Lilly share their picks from this year’s New Zealand International Film Festival.

  • Internet Histories | 14 July

    Internet Histories | 14 July

    The Bluff Beacon and the new and developing art of writing online.

  • The Ballad of Western Barbie

    The Ballad of Western Barbie

    When Megan Dunn was seven, she, her mum and Western Barbie decamped to Huntly for a little while. Here, she remembers six months of smokestacks, churches, communion, and the things we take a long time to recognise.

  • A Town Like Here

    A Town Like Here

    Gaylene Preston’s Christchurch earthquake drama, Hope and Wire, debuted on TV3 this week. The series borrows the title of The Eastern’s 2012 album, which was recorded in quake-ruined Dallington. Preston and The Eastern’s Adam McGrath talk to Gavin Bertram about their chance meeting, and the other experiences that bought the show to fruition.

  • The Folly of Myth-Making: Once on Chunuk Bair

    The Folly of Myth-Making: Once on Chunuk Bair

    James Wenley examines Auckland Theatre Company’s production of Once on Chanuk Bair and asks: What is it remembering?

  • The Vision Does Not Stop Here: The Factory’s International Dream

    The Vision Does Not Stop Here: The Factory’s International Dream

    For a musical that seems certain to meet international success, The Factory was born out of discontent, frustration, and a twenty-something year dream. Ahead of their Edinburgh season, James Wenley examines their long evolution.

  • A Brief History of Silo Theatre

    A Brief History of Silo Theatre

    Silo Theatre is renowned for it’s slick, sexy, contemporary shows, but this wasn’t always the case. We take a look back at the thirteen years Shane Bosher spent building the company from ground up.

  • Guy Montgomery on The Most Fun Thing He Can Do

    Guy Montgomery on The Most Fun Thing He Can Do

    We chat to this year’s Billy T Award winner, Guy Montgomery about stand-up, vulnerability, and why he does what he does.

  • Start Your Own Fucking Band: An Oral History of the Mint Chicks

    Start Your Own Fucking Band: An Oral History of the Mint Chicks

    We inaugurate the Pantograph Punch’s new video series by commemorating ten years since the first Mint Chicks EPs – Frances Haszard and Louis Olsen animate the recollections of the fans, while Kieran Clarkin has an oral history of the group’s early years.

Recent

Hope and Wire: Part Three

Hope and Wire: Part Three

Did you watch ‘Hope And Wire’ to the end? If you didn’t, it pulled finger in the end, with a mixture of optimistic fairy-tale gloss and uneasy gloom. Also a ukelele, though.

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Review: SIN

Review: SIN

SIN has grand ambitions, but it tackles too much and fails to bring together its myriad threads in a meaningful way.

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Hope And Wire: Part Two

Hope And Wire: Part Two

Time passes slowly.

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Review: The Wilderness

Review: The Wilderness

More so than any desperate mash-up of symphony orchestras to Top 40 BBQ dub, Claire Cowan’s Blackbird Ensemble are doing radical, vital and contemporary things with classical music in NZ, as Hayden Eastmond-Mein discovers.

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Hope And Wire: Part One

Hope And Wire: Part One

The first episode of Hope and Wire does a lot of lining up its performers for one singular, terrible event. When it doesn’t work, it’s terrible; the good news is that once that event takes place, it starts to work a lot more than it doesn’t.

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Internet Histories | 30 June

Internet Histories | 30 June

This week on the internet: how we talk about Google, how we talk about art, and how we talk about voting

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Review: Halcyon Ghosts

Review: Halcyon Ghosts

Sam Sampson’s Halcyon Ghosts rushes between the microscopic and the celestial, at a scale and breadth that delights.

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Internet Histories | 16 June

Internet Histories | 16 June

The conditions and possibilities of reading books meant for children.

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Review: Sunday Roast

Review: Sunday Roast

Sunday Roast is a brash and energetic romp, which smiles as it skewers that beloved national pastime: Eating.

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Review: Shadowland

Review: Shadowland

Shadowland showcases some incredible skill but lacks the necessary narrative to keep you interested.

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